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  • qlewis 10:59 pm on November 4, 2010 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , save, ,   

    Poll: Do you save textbook receipts? 

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  • qlewis 12:45 am on November 3, 2010 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , , complex, disruptive, graph, jester, , technology, , world   

    Bity Book Bite: Graph of a College Textbook 

    Scrolling for more advice on escaping higher textbook prices and I come across on Google Images this interesting graph:


    Click to enlarge

    As expected I am not the only one blogging about raising textbook prices, and this graph came from a 2008 post made by the Disruptive Library Technology Jester. It details the basic structure of how a textbook is bought to the moment when a student tries to sell the book back. The article where the graph came from, “The Complex World of The Textbook,” contained valuable information on the subject of textbooks ranging from ebooks to student’s reactions to the rising textbook prices.

    The article has updated since it’s first post and is still open for those who want to input their thoughts. The link can be found here.

     
  • qlewis 2:21 am on November 2, 2010 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , , , saving,   

    Bagging Books Brouhaha: Saving Book Receipts 

    The ever important receipt. For those who have credit or debit cards, it is a life saver when one needs to return or verify a purchase.

    For the University of Dallas, their bookstore allows a short period of time where a student can return a book that they had bought, new or used, to the bookstore and get the full price back…only if they brought the book’s receipt with them as well.

    Usually this window of opportunity lasts the first few weeks of the semester (usually three or four) and the reason for this is that some teachers change at the last minute which books are required for their class and so a student may have spent precious money on a book they don’t need…at all.

    There are pros and cons to this depending on what payment method you choose when buying the book.

    If you bought the book with cash then when you bring in the receipt then you can get the money back in cash. However if you bought the book using a credit card or check then the bookstore has to get ahold of the bank you are with.

    Check your bank’s policies on refunds and fees because each bank is different in how they handle returned money. I had to wait four days for my fee with Bank of America to be returned to my account and in the meanwhile I still needed to buy books.

    Also keeping the receipts in a knowledgeable place is another issue. Even if you know you have the receipt it is best to know where it is at all times for those first few weeks.

    Check the bag the books came in to make sure the receipt was taken out of the bag. Sometimes when discarding the bag, one ends up throwing away the receipt as well.

    Personally, I use my receipts as bookmarks for my books so that I know where they are in case I need them. Other good spots are beside the bed or in a designated corner on a table or desk.

    Whatever works for you is good as long as you remember. Receipts are good tools to keep.

     
  • qlewis 12:40 am on November 1, 2010 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: accessing, , , , , , per, , strategies   

    Bity Book Bite: Accessing Book Strategies Per Semester 

    This is going to be a short entry but when you are registering for classes this semester think very carefully about the amount of books you will need for that class.

    Begin finding out which books are absolutely necessary for the first few weeks and if that decision is not as clear then see which book relates more to the title of the class.

    One thing is to look at the class description. If the description says they are going to discuss Dante, Homer, and Plato then more than likely a book relating to Dante would be the first to get.

    Just think things through and do not get discouraged.

     
  • qlewis 3:41 am on October 31, 2010 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , getting, , , , , purchase, walking, way   

    Poll: How do you purchase books from the bookstore? 

     
  • qlewis 3:25 am on October 31, 2010 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , , , , HEOA, ,   

    Bagging Book Brouhaha: The Higher Education Opportunity Act (HEOA) 

    University of Dallas Textbook Manager Matt told me of a new law that was implemented this year that should make buying textbooks easier for college students: The Higher Education Opportunity Act (HEOA)

    Started in July 1, 2010, the act qualifies that every student gets all information in regards to their classes before school ends or even before the next semester starts. Under Section 133, part a, the act details itself as so:

    “The purpose of this section is to ensure that students have access to affordable course materials by decreasing costs to students and enhancing transparency and disclosure with respect to the selection, purchase, sale, and use of course materials. It is the intent of this section to encourage all of the involved parties, including faculty, students, administrators, institutions of higher education, bookstores, distributors, and publishers, to work together to identify ways to decrease the cost of college textbooks and supplemental materials for students while supporting the academic freedom of faculty members to select high quality course materials for students.”

    Listed on the University of Dallas website, under the Students tab lists the Banner Web section.

    When going into the University of Dallas bookstore, bring Manager Matt your schedule listing the classes you plan on taking. In Banner Web there is a new section in which one can look up the classes and the books required for that class. He can show students exactly where to look if they have any trouble finding it.

    At this point in time I cannot tell exactly where to look because students cannot register for classes at this time. Only when a student registers for the class can they access all the book information. The class schedule can be found in Banner Web but you need to get your adviser’s pin number

    For more information on HEOA here are some links:

    The guidelines

    The History

     
  • qlewis 2:27 am on October 29, 2010 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , , , , or, used   

    Bity Book Bite: Online or Bookstore? Used books 

    One major obstacle when choosing between buying a book at the bookstore or ordering the book online is whether or not the book will be in good condition. Especially used books.

    There is a catch 22 of sorts when buying a book from the bookstore may produce a book that when you flip through a few pages they fall out or when ordering online a person says the book is “used-like new.”

    At least at the University of Dallas, they allow students to sift through a used book before they buy it. That way they can see for sure whether or not the book will last.

    Online there is no way to check and see. You just have to wait and hope for the best. Also what may seem to the online seller as “like new” may turn out to be different than what you consider.

    Personally, if one has to use the internet to get used books then one good guide is to pay attention to the grades people give the seller. Here are a few examples:

    • Amazon.com uses a star system with their sellers but they also have sellers promoted by themselves. Those are the sellers to buy from because it is more likely to get a used book in good shape though their prices may be higher than other used book sellers.

    • Half.com uses votes but allows people to scroll down and choose what condition of used book they want and choose the star rating of their seller feedback in regard to the used book.

    • Barnes and Noble.com uses ratings and stars for their used books. Along with where the book will be shipping from and its due days of arrival:

    If anything, when buying used always make sure the money going into the purchase was spent wisely.

     
  • qlewis 1:44 am on October 29, 2010 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , buy, , condition, , often,   

    Poll: In college bookstores which condition of books do you often buy? 

     
  • qlewis 8:35 pm on October 25, 2010 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , , , employing, , Shelf Tags,   

    Bagging Books Brouhaha: Employing Shelf Tags in University of Dallas 

    Shelf Tags are a very important thing to look at in the University of Dallas bookstore. Each tag lists the class number which the book is for. If the teacher has more than one book needed for their class then when you find one book you can see on the left hand corner how many are left for their class.

    Usually a shelf tag looks similar to this one below:

    This year I saw there are “For Rent” tags that distinguish the new system. These have been newly implemented and so hopefully the system makes it easier for students who can’t purchase the book right away to have it ready for class.

    The biggest clue to determine which books are for rent and which aren’t if the “for rent” tab is not on the side of the shelf tag is a section below the prices that says the rental price.

    So pay close attention when in the bookstore. These shelf tags have cleared much confusion.

    Thanks to Manager Matt for allowing the photos to be taken. Thanks to picture taker of photos of shelf tags that were taken by Laura Victor. Through the eyes of a freshman she observes with new eyes the UD system. Her blog can be found here

     
  • qlewis 3:55 am on October 25, 2010 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , Ebay, Half.com,   

    Bity Book Bite: Half.com 

    I usually don’t hear about this site often but for those who haven’t found the site yet, it is worth a look.

    The site describes itself as part of an Ebay company and also provides sources for selling videos, DVD’s, CD’s, etc.

    The first page you see looks like this:

    Once there one can use the search engine and look for books just like other sites. In a way it works like Amazon.com, one can set up an account and sell their stuff through their site.

    To find out more here is the link

    I find this site easier to navigate than Amazon.com but that is just my opinion.

     
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